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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 9:59 pm 
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evilal wrote:
watch+wait wrote:

Edit, I just checked and found I am exempt from having to sit 7 CIMA exams. :shock:


But you still have to pay the exam fees :-)

I just checked and my honours degree in pure mathematics does not exempt me from anything, but someone with an MSIS degree gets exempted from "Fundamentals of Business Mathematics". Go figure.

Yes, but you will find the exam easy to pass.


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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 10:02 pm 
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Landlord wrote:
evilal wrote:
watch+wait wrote:

Edit, I just checked and found I am exempt from having to sit 7 CIMA exams. :shock:


But you still have to pay the exam fees :-)

I just checked and my honours degree in pure mathematics does not exempt me from anything, but someone with an MSIS degree gets exempted from "Fundamentals of Business Mathematics". Go figure.

Yes, but you will find the exam easy to pass.


Probably not any more :-(

I recently was given a vintage copy of Mathematics Made Difficult and it's quite accurately titled but a great read :-D

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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 5:19 am 
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I think this is an interesting historical article about life and expectations thereof in a very different age:
http://www.spiegel.de/international/eur ... 42820.html
I'd also recommend a book called "how to get by on 5 dinarii a day in ancient Rome".

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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 6:27 pm 
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ps200306 wrote:
Kate P wrote:
Disposable clothes are cheap, there's no doubt about that. But you get a season out of them, a year at most and then they have to be dumped - not donated - because they're unusable. Now maybe it's true that people have far more clothes/items than they might have in the past. High St clothes are expensive and not great quality. Principles used to be good. Warehouse, River Island, Next - all charge well for 'cheap' clothes, Dorothy Perkins (particularly), Penneys (even more particularly) and Dunnes sell generally very poor quality clothing.


I don't know why the quality of clothing is so bad in this part of the world. My practice for the last couple of decades has been to take empty suitcases to the states every couple of years, and buy armfuls of inexpensive, decent quality clothes. They used to be all made in Mexico, but they're more likely to be Indian these days. At any rate, the cloth tends to have a bit more heft than here, and quality and durability is generally much better. (I'm not a New York shopping weekend kind of person, and admit to being pretty much fashion unconscious). Anyway, my point is that it's more than possible to get decent, cheap clothes, although we seem to be a bit shortchanged in Ireland.


I reckon Men's clothes are tougher than women's. My wife buys something once a week from Penny's, and it may never be worn, or if worn, not for very long (There's a fairly sizeable collection of shoes and bags, and a high percentage of those are never used). It's usually unloved quicker than it's worn out, so making it more robust makes little sense from the manufacturers perspective. I tend to wear stuff out, even if I try to stay reasonably fashionable. I usually buy something once a month, but I spend quite a bit more than herself.

Two suits I had made up in Thailand in 2005, perfect. A Banana Republic coat from four years ago, fine (pity I don't have a Property Pin brand to go with it ;)). Magee trousers still grand after two years. I still have a few shirts from more than five years ago.

The pattern of destruction is jumpers/coats/jackets losing shape. Trousers getting frayed around pockets/ankles. Shirt collars/cuff's wearing out. Shoes getting too scuffed, or the soles getting loose. Two pairs of Aldo shoes were unwearable after six months so I'll never buy anything from them again. The secret is not to keep wearing clothes day in/day out, and you'll usually get a couple of years from them.

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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:28 pm 
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Scrambler wrote:

The problem for me with the whole medical thing is the all consuming nature of such a job, which can be very hard to manage with family life, young children. Also loads of CPD and emotionally draining situations and it's all very involved. Very exhausting, have a medical background and am hoping to move onto something a little less stressful and more compatable with doing 3 different school runs each day and not employing someone to bring up my children


Healthcare involves lots more occupations and options than just being a doctor. Presumably some of them are better than others re work-life balance. In terms of a future-proof occupation, I would have thought one can predict with 99.9% certainty that people in the future will a) get sick and die and b) not want to get sick and die.

On the less work/more work debate, the crucial thing I think is to avoid boredom. If working much less and living frugally and slowly is your thing, great. If you get a kick out of working and can find a career that is varied enough not to loose the will to live after 20 years, nothing wrong with 'living to work'. I have been able to deal ok with overwork, stress, chaos, low morale and some fairly borderline lunatic work colleagues over the years, but boredom kills me. Hence why any time I try to do the 'I am sick of being Mrs. Dedicated, time to kick back, walk out of the office at five and stop taking on too much work and too much responsibility' rant, my OH starts looking extremely alarmed.


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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2012 7:22 am 
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dolanbaker wrote:
Poor Student wrote:
boomshackala wrote:
nah, it's men in general. Men retiring at 55 die earlier than men retiring at 60


Got a source for this? Always thought it was the other way around?


I have seen statistics that state that something like 50% of civil servants (UK) die within 9 months of retirement, I suspect a lot of it is attitude to being "put out to grass!".

If you have an all consuming hobby that could easily replace the hole work leaves in your life, then your chances of living longer are much better than someone who just "waits for god".

Just to follow on this point



Quote:

Do those who retire early live longer?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18952037
It's often said that early retirement lengthens your life, but is it true? And do some professions have a shorter life expectancy?

If a statistical claim is repeated often enough it can become accepted as a universal truth, even if it has no basis in fact.

There's the suggestion that 93% of communication is non-verbal (not true) or the oft-repeated suggestion that there are more people alive today than have ever lived (not true either).

Here's another - the later you retire, the earlier you will die. A variation on this theme is the "fact" that, in some jobs, average life expectancy after retirement is just 18 months. We've seen it said of teachers, prison officers, surgeons and others.

The implication is that people in these kinds of demanding jobs are working themselves into their graves - and should probably be cut some slack. But is there any evidence for it?

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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:00 am 
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There won't be any work in the future, fortunately.

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 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:04 am 
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the edge wrote:
There won't be any work in the future, fortunately.

Image


Not so. According to MS it will be like this

Image

Just buy W8.

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