Follow, retweet @dailypinster




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 188 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 11:08 am 
Offline
Too Big to Fail
User avatar

Joined: Aug 21, 2009
Posts: 4385
Location: Mesopotatia
CrossChris wrote:
I can't tell you all how disappointed I am with this thread. No posts by Doc Brown and not even a mention of time travel! Now back to my Futurama boxed set ...... :roll:



_________________
The real damage is done by those millions who want to 'get by'. The ordinary men who just want to be left in peace. Those who don’t want their lives disturbed by anything bigger than themselves. Those with no sides and no causes. Those who won’t take measure of their own strength, for fear of antagonizing their own weakness. Those people who roll up their spirits into tiny little balls so as to be safe. Safe?! From what?
Sophie Scholl


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:27 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation
User avatar

Joined: Dec 29, 2008
Posts: 2169
catbear wrote:
boomshackala wrote:
When the first europeans got to America, they couldn't get over the amount of leisure time the natives were allowing themselves. this was a stone age culture. technology?

Image


Life expectancy was around 35-40 afaik
similar to over here at the time, maybe a little lower
penicillin changed all that in the 1800s for us.
Sounds like stone age living with a triage tent is the way to go

_________________
“I’m an enemy of consumerism. Because of this hyperconsumerism, we’re forgetting about fundamental things and wasting human strength on frivolities that have little to do with human happiness.”
Uruguayan President José Mujica, World's Poorest President


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:31 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
boomshackala wrote:
catbear wrote:
boomshackala wrote:
When the first europeans got to America, they couldn't get over the amount of leisure time the natives were allowing themselves. this was a stone age culture. technology?

Image


Life expectancy was around 35-40 afaik
similar to over here at the time, maybe a little lower
penicillin changed all that in the 1800s for us.
Sounds like stone age living with a triage tent is the way to go


The antimicrobial effect of penicillium secretions was identified in 1928, penicillin first being isolated (though not its structure determined) in about 1940, if I recall correctly.

The large increase in life expectancy in the 19th century was largely due to improvments in water sanitation, an understanding of the germ theory of disease and hence, infection control, and more widespread vaccination.

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:34 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation
User avatar

Joined: Dec 29, 2008
Posts: 2169
Madness of Crowds wrote:
boomshackala wrote:
catbear wrote:
boomshackala wrote:
When the first europeans got to America, they couldn't get over the amount of leisure time the natives were allowing themselves. this was a stone age culture. technology?

Image


Life expectancy was around 35-40 afaik
similar to over here at the time, maybe a little lower
penicillin changed all that in the 1800s for us.
Sounds like stone age living with a triage tent is the way to go


The antimicrobial effect of penicillium secretions was identified in 1928, penicillin first being isolated (though not its structure determined) in about 1940, if I recall correctly.

The large increase in life expectancy in the 19th century was largely due to improvments in water sanitation, an understanding of the germ theory of disease and hence, infection control, and more widespread vaccination.

You're right, sorry I meant vaccination

_________________
“I’m an enemy of consumerism. Because of this hyperconsumerism, we’re forgetting about fundamental things and wasting human strength on frivolities that have little to do with human happiness.”
Uruguayan President José Mujica, World's Poorest President


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:37 pm 
Offline
Of Systemic Importance
User avatar

Joined: Apr 1, 2009
Posts: 5311
Location: Utopia
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 12:39 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
ex-Patrick wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Nope. Because everything is easier now, you do it much more often, or at least that's what I'm told.

The hair drier is a good example. Back in ye good olde days, people simply didn't wash their hair every day. No hair dryer use, fewer towels to wash, less washing to put through the mangle...

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:03 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Aug 23, 2008
Posts: 3335
Location: Bogtrotterland!
Madness of Crowds wrote:
ex-Patrick wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Nope. Because everything is easier now, you do it much more often, or at least that's what I'm told.

The hair drier is a good example. Back in ye good olde days, people simply didn't wash their hair every day. No hair dryer use, fewer towels to wash, less washing to put through the mangle...


Most clothes are washed after only a few minutes wear, whether they need it or not, I'm certain they would be worn for longer before going into the laundary if washing was done by hand.

_________________
"Democracy is like sausage, you want it, but you don't want to know how it is made". [John Godfrey Saxe]
Ronald Coase, Nobel Economic Sciences, said in 1991 “If we torture the data long enough, it will confess.”
"Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes it's laws" — Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothschild


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:08 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
dolanbaker wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
ex-Patrick wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Nope. Because everything is easier now, you do it much more often, or at least that's what I'm told.

The hair drier is a good example. Back in ye good olde days, people simply didn't wash their hair every day. No hair dryer use, fewer towels to wash, less washing to put through the mangle...


Most clothes are washed after only a few minutes wear, whether they need it or not, I'm certain they would be worn for longer before going into the laundary if washing was done by hand.


Precisely. I'll see if I can find it, but somebody did a study to show that there is almost no need to wash jeans, since their bacterial load after a month was no higher than after three or four hours; something to do with the indigo dye, apparently.

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:16 pm 
Offline
Neo Landlord
User avatar

Joined: Jan 10, 2012
Posts: 206
You can wear jeans for three months...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:19 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
NigelTuffnel wrote:


That's the one, thanks.

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:38 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation
User avatar

Joined: Dec 29, 2008
Posts: 2169
If there is one item that has transformed the lives of women in the last 100 years, it is washing machines.

not withstanding the additional washing that goes on, point accepted on that

_________________
“I’m an enemy of consumerism. Because of this hyperconsumerism, we’re forgetting about fundamental things and wasting human strength on frivolities that have little to do with human happiness.”
Uruguayan President José Mujica, World's Poorest President


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:43 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation

Joined: May 7, 2009
Posts: 1614
Madness of Crowds wrote:
ex-Patrick wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Nope. Because everything is easier now, you do it much more often, or at least that's what I'm told.

The hair drier is a good example. Back in ye good olde days, people simply didn't wash their hair every day. No hair dryer use, fewer towels to wash, less washing to put through the mangle...

People could wash their hair as much as they did in ye good old days and use the hair dryer to reduce the time taken thus increasing their leisure time.
The fact that someone might now choose to wash their hair more often does not change the fact that modern technology has enabled them to do it quicker and have more leisure time.
I could chose to drive everywhere at 3mph and claim I only have as much leisure as the people in ye good old days had when they walked everywhere, or I could drive quicker and increase my leisure time. The technology is there, it's up to me decide how I want to use it.

_________________
"People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. I don't believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can't find them, make them" (G B Shaw)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 1:46 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
Esselte wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
ex-Patrick wrote:
Madness of Crowds wrote:
I'm sure I read somewhere that the only piece of modern technology to reduce workload and increase leisure time was the television.
Really? I'd expect more impact from:
washing machine (must save several hours per week in most households)
clothes dryer (at least a couple of hours saved wringing wet clothes)
dishwasher (20 minutes per day, maybe?)
electric iron (for a big load of laundry, should save 20 minutes)
vacuum cleaner (save maybe 10 minutes per cleaning session)
engine powered lawnmower (save 30 minutes per week in growing season)
hair dryer (save 5 minutes every day, maybe)


Nope. Because everything is easier now, you do it much more often, or at least that's what I'm told.

The hair drier is a good example. Back in ye good olde days, people simply didn't wash their hair every day. No hair dryer use, fewer towels to wash, less washing to put through the mangle...

People could wash their hair as much as they did in ye good old days and use the hair dryer to reduce the time taken thus increasing their leisure time.
The fact that someone might now choose to wash their hair more often does not change the fact that modern technology has enabled them to do it quicker and have more leisure time.
I could chose to drive everywhere at 3mph and claim I only have as much leisure as the people in ye good old days had when they walked everywhere, or I could drive quicker and increase my leisure time. The technology is there, it's up to me decide how I want to use it.



True, you could, but in practice, that is not how the overwhelming majority of people have behaved.
Perhaps I should have phrased it as "the only piece of modern technology that has reduced workload and increased leisure time is the television". The emphasis was on events, not capabilities.

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 2:03 pm 
Offline
IMF'd

Joined: Sep 13, 2007
Posts: 31316
Location: Tullamore
I dispute the washing machine thing. I remember the days before we had a washing machine. With a family of four and as little as we washed/changed clothes in those days, I remember my mother doing two wash days a week. Minimum two hours hand washing clothes, wringing them out on the taps then the ins and outs of hanging them on the line/taking them in when it looked like rain/hanging them out again. Add to that ironing required and you are up to a heap of time spent on laundry. A heap more than Mrs. YM spends on laundry for our equivalent family of four even allowing for being cleaner and wearing clothes to less dirty.

edit: PS there's also a world of difference between stuffing a wash in the washing machine/transferring to the dryer and washing by hand/hanging out laundry. In the former, you can do other stuff while the washing is on (ours runs overnight), in the latter, it is hard graft...

_________________
"It is impossible to design a system so perfect that no one needs to be good."

So long and thanks for all the fish.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Work in the Future..
PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2012 2:18 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Apr 4, 2010
Posts: 4538
yoganmahew wrote:
I dispute the washing machine thing. I remember the days before we had a washing machine. With a family of four and as little as we washed/changed clothes in those days, I remember my mother doing two wash days a week. Minimum two hours hand washing clothes, wringing them out on the taps then the ins and outs of hanging them on the line/taking them in when it looked like rain/hanging them out again. Add to that ironing required and you are up to a heap of time spent on laundry. A heap more than Mrs. YM spends on laundry for our equivalent family of four even allowing for being cleaner and wearing clothes to less dirty.

edit: PS there's also a world of difference between stuffing a wash in the washing machine/transferring to the dryer and washing by hand/hanging out laundry. In the former, you can do other stuff while the washing is on (ours runs overnight), in the latter, it is hard graft...


And while it's running, you can also use all your other domestic appliances, to fit in some extra housework, that you wouldn't have had time to do in years past...or maybe watch a little TV. :wink:

_________________
People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.


Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Book I, Chapter X, Part II,


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 188 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  

Follow, Retweet @dailypinster



Pyramid Built, Is Better Built! - Latest Property Discussions www.thepropertypin.com