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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2016 6:09 pm 
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Population change (allowing for no immigration/emigration) would decrease that cohort by 91,454.

Assuming similar labour force entry rates (e.g. only 16% of 15-19 year olds were "in the labour force" in 2011), the overall labour force in the age bracket from 15-34 would be reduced by 87,000.


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2016 11:52 pm 
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TheJackal wrote:
Latest figures for 15-34 year olds per QNHS Q1 2016
Image

Over the lifetime of the FG/Labour Government -179,100 left the workforce. Massive emigration, even allowing for population changes



Its 8/9 years since the unemployment started to jump, a lot of 25-30 yr olds would easily be in the 34+ age group now. Be interesting to see the Census numbers when it comes out


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 11:51 am 
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Joined: Jul 9, 2008
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Location: In the Sandpit.
This is somewhat refreshing.....even a little promising.
Quote:
The Government needs to be honest with emigrants about their prospects on returning to Ireland rather than offering them an open invitation to come back, newly appointed Minister of State for the Diaspora Joe McHugh has said.
The previous government created the #HomeToWork social media and poster campaign over Christmas as part of Fine Gael’s commitment to attract 70,000 Irish emigrants back by 2020.
However, in an interview with The Irish Times, Mr McHugh said Ireland needed to be “more targeted in attracting people back”, as there would not be jobs for all.
“Do we just ask them to come back and everything will be grand? I think we need to be honest about the barriers that are there, and try to address them,” he said.


His interview is quite interesting - not sure I ever heard this from a member of a serving government before.
Quote:
What about the 100,000s of Irish who have emigrated in the past decade?
I do treat that block of emigrants differently. A lot of my friends left school early in the 1980s and went to London, working manual jobs. But this flow of emigration, most of them are very highly skilled and educated, and are working in legal practices, as engineers, as quantity surveyors. We have to find out what their wants and needs are. I have been focusing for the past week on the barriers to return, including the high cost of car insurance and health insurance, barriers to getting mortgages or planning permission. I will be working on these as chair of the interdepartmental working group on diaspora affairs.


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2016 2:34 am 
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Location: New Zealand
Prrrf they can waffle all they like but this emigrant would need to see massive changes in Irish public services, political culture, society, business and employment practices and attitudes etc etc etc before even thinking about going back to Ireland. Here over 4 1/2 years now, got a great job, extensive multi-cultural social circle of good friends, I like the lifestyle, I've lost a good bit of weight and am much fitter and healthier than I was in Ireland, got my permanent residency, just over a year away from citizenship and Passport #3....and then there's the significantly better (but not too hot) weather. Life is pretty easy here and in general stuff just works without much hassle. Sure there's some downsides - property prices are absurd especially considering the often dreadful building quality of many houses here, the local tea is awful (but I found a source of Barry's 8) ) and for some bizarre reason Kiwis just cannot produce edible bacon - but overall it's a waaaay easier, more active, less stressful life.

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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2016 6:22 pm 
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Sidewinder wrote:
Prrrf they can waffle all they like but this emigrant would need to see massive changes in Irish public services, political culture, society, business and employment practices and attitudes etc etc etc before even thinking about going back to Ireland. Here over 4 1/2 years now, got a great job, extensive multi-cultural social circle of good friends, I like the lifestyle, I've lost a good bit of weight and am much fitter and healthier than I was in Ireland, got my permanent residency, just over a year away from citizenship and Passport #3....and then there's the significantly better (but not too hot) weather. Life is pretty easy here and in general stuff just works without much hassle. Sure there's some downsides - property prices are absurd especially considering the often dreadful building quality of many houses here, the local tea is awful (but I found a source of Barry's 8) ) and for some bizarre reason Kiwis just cannot produce edible bacon - but overall it's a waaaay easier, more active, less stressful life.


Where did you go?

I came here for better life some time ago, but it seems despite more money I am getting worse quality standard every year..
oh I see my childhood emigration idea NZ..

I've heard from wife of a kiwi that NZ can be quite expensive with relation to their 'low' salaries (they are both working in medical care for mental troubled old people). It seems similar for me in Software.

oh ye and my health is going opposite direction to yours, since I am in Ireland as I don't have time for too much sport I like.
From time to time Polish govt tries to say same bollocks about returns, but massive ones are highly unlikely. There is about 2.25-3 million emigrants in 38.5 citizens. I guess a lot of people can have nice jobs there, but after X years you are changed same as your 'homeland'.

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This is my best finding this year:
06/2007: Central Bank predicts soft landing for housing
http://www.independent.ie/business/iris ... 96858.html
It's all grand


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:30 am 
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Location: New Zealand
Wellington.

It's only expensive if you want it to be, eating out for example is pretty cheap, you can get a decent feed in any of dozens of good restaurants in the city centre for $20-25 (12-15 euro) a main plate. Utilities are quite cheap if you actively shop around - electricity, gas and broadband for our house with 4 adults is about $240 per month or around $80 each. A weeks shopping would usually cost me about $60-70. So my total fixed costs are about 1300 a month which is less than a third of my salary. Course I still manage to blow most of the rest on beer, cigs, gigs, meals out and the accumulation of random Stuff but if I lived like a monk I could easily save loads.

If you insist on buying a wildly overpriced badly-built house which means living out in the burbs with all the associated mortgage, rates, repairs, car/commute costs etc and yer on a low wage then it's probably quite tight, but that's a result of your own stupid choices, innit.

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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 8:37 am 
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Sidewinder wrote:
Wellington.

It's only expensive if you want it to be, eating out for example is pretty cheap, you can get a decent feed in any of dozens of good restaurants in the city centre for $20-25 (12-15 euro) a main plate. Utilities are quite cheap if you actively shop around - electricity, gas and broadband for our house with 4 adults is about $240 per month or around $80 each. A weeks shopping would usually cost me about $60-70. So my total fixed costs are about 1300 a month which is less than a third of my salary. Course I still manage to blow most of the rest on beer, cigs, gigs, meals out and the accumulation of random Stuff but if I lived like a monk I could easily save loads.

If you insist on buying a wildly overpriced badly-built house which means living out in the burbs with all the associated mortgage, rates, repairs, car/commute costs etc and yer on a low wage then it's probably quite tight, but that's a result of your own stupid choices, innit.


Well that sounds exactly like Dublin on the whole, with better weather but worse bacon.


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 8:51 am 
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Why are houses so shit in NZ?

Did I read here there was a large niche renovating houses that were hastily builtin the 70s etc? I wonder is it importing Oz building standards when the climate is more like Ireland?


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 10:35 am 
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Location: New Zealand
onioneater wrote:
Well that sounds exactly like Dublin on the whole, with better weather but worse bacon.


Better food in general but the bacon is a bit of a downer alright. It's also much more relaxed and friendly in the city centre than Dublin, the level of random violence, fighting, pissing, puking, junkies, aggression and general menace on a night out in pretty much any Irish town simply wouldn't be tolerated here. That alone makes a big difference to general quality of life. Much stronger tenancy laws. Infinitely better management/work practices, pretty much every single boss I ever had in Ireland over nearly 25 years working there was an exploitative c*nt.

I've probably mentioned before one of the major pluses for me is that Kiwis are refreshingly straightforward and honest. They say precisely what they mean. Whereas half the conversations you have in Ireland are enigmas wrapped in riddles of oblique references, veiled hints and convoluted side-steps. Used to drive me demented, but hey that's just me.

As to why the houses are shit...well this was one reason https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaky_homes_crisis

Kiwis also seem to have this bonkers attitude that houses are somehow supposed to be cold and damp and miserable and us effete Europeans with our nonsensical crazy talk about central heating, insulation and double-glazing need to man up already. So wherever two or more ex-pats are gathered in one place, the conversation will inevitably get round to incredulous curses at Kiwis and their attitudes to housing build quality.

They've just passed a law recently that whenever a tenant moves out of a rented property the landlord MUST get the property up to scratch with respect to stuff like leaks, draught-proofing, damp, wall and ceiling insulation and so on before re-renting it. That should improve the situation considerably over the next few years but right now it's still pretty bad.

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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:50 pm 
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Posts: 1300
slasher wrote:
Why are houses so shit in NZ?

Did I read here there was a large niche renovating houses that were hastily builtin the 70s etc? I wonder is it importing Oz building standards when the climate is more like Ireland?


No insulation or heating....

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Why is it so windy here?

This is my best finding this year:
06/2007: Central Bank predicts soft landing for housing
http://www.independent.ie/business/iris ... 96858.html
It's all grand


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 4:54 am 
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Location: New Zealand
Oh so very glad I bailed when I did and worked hard to secure my permanent residency, after the lunatic vote in England and Wales today!

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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jun 24, 2016 6:22 pm 
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Posts: 1300
I am really confused in recent months.. Thinking about moving to NZ/AUS returning to Poland or buying house in Ireland. Too much choice is bad for you. :/

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Why is it so windy here?

This is my best finding this year:
06/2007: Central Bank predicts soft landing for housing
http://www.independent.ie/business/iris ... 96858.html
It's all grand


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2016 6:02 pm 
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Migrant

Joined: Jul 29, 2016
Posts: 3
What about letting Irish diaspora come back to live when they retire? No risk of taking away jobs and retirees have money to invest in homes, etc. Should be a win-win, no?


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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2016 4:46 am 
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Location: New Zealand
mightyz wrote:
I am really confused in recent months.. Thinking about moving to NZ/AUS returning to Poland or buying house in Ireland. Too much choice is bad for you. :/


I'd sit tight for a bit as far as NZ/Oz are concerned, the Oz mining/commodity boom is over and their housing bubble looks to have finally peaked. NZ's housing bubble should also be nearing peak (check out the relevant threads in the "International property bubbles" section). Nearly all the banks in both countries are cross-owned by the same small group of banking conglomerates, so a serious stumble in either country will cause an immediate banking crisis in the other. It could all get rather "interesting" over the next 12 months.

Course if you can get a visa for a decent paying job that would be insulated from an Oz/NZ banking & property crash, then coming here now could actually be a shrewd move.

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 Post subject: Re: The Emigration Thread.
PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2016 9:32 am 
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Posts: 1300
You are absolutely right. I am waiting for next AUS/NZ or even world recession.
We both have decent jobs and market is good, I am just bit tired of Ireland after 9 years and recent disappointments with state health service...

plus the weather.. :/ This summer I felt back in love with getting away from city by bike in 30+ Celsius.
I would like my kids to know what summer really means (hide from the sun)

Image

btw.. last time I've emigrated it was straight into housing crash :D I was young and single so I was not concerned much.

_________________
Why is it so windy here?

This is my best finding this year:
06/2007: Central Bank predicts soft landing for housing
http://www.independent.ie/business/iris ... 96858.html
It's all grand


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