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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:34 am 
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has anyone considered the increase in price of their broadband/telephony in the past 10 years?

€800-1200 a year seems to be the price for a normal package these days. where are the €240/year deals now?

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:14 pm 
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Thing Fish wrote:
has anyone considered the increase in price of their broadband/telephony in the past 10 years?

€800-1200 a year seems to be the price for a normal package these days. where are the €240/year deals now?

I would imagine that a lot of the increased costs is due to the infrastructure replacement projects that are currently ongoing in the datacoms industry.

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:22 pm 
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Thing Fish wrote:
has anyone considered the increase in price of their broadband/telephony in the past 10 years?

€800-1200 a year seems to be the price for a normal package these days. where are the €240/year deals now?


800 sounds high unless you’re getting TV as well. 50-60 per month is typical. Don’t remember it ever being 20 per month all in for fixed broadband; was that excluding line rental or something?


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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:34 pm 
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Worstpigeon wrote:
Thing Fish wrote:
has anyone considered the increase in price of their broadband/telephony in the past 10 years?

€800-1200 a year seems to be the price for a normal package these days. where are the €240/year deals now?

800 sounds high unless you’re getting TV as well. 50-60 per month is typical. Don’t remember it ever being 20 per month all in for fixed broadband; was that excluding line rental or something?

Fifteen years go I was paying twice as much for 0.5 Mbps as I do today for 240 Mbps, a nearly thousand-fold improvement.

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:25 pm 
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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKBN1D225C


More of the same


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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 2:53 am 
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McWilliams on Why Ireland's growing economy isn’t making you richer

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:01 am 
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ps200306 wrote:

It appears that DMW can see that we're returning to a way of life that existed before the industrial revolution, one where a small number of people owned everything and the vast majority owned nothing! Static wages, cheap mass produced goods (mostly by automated systems using only a few workers), asset inflation etc. All these are rapidly pulling the assets of value out of reach of the majority of people

If it wasn't for the diversions that modern technology provide in the form of cheap & instant entertainment, there could have already been an uprising!

Maybe it's time to revisit the idea of a universal income.

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"Democracy is like sausage, you want it, but you don't want to know how it is made". [John Godfrey Saxe]
Ronald Coase, Nobel Economic Sciences, said in 1991 “If we torture the data long enough, it will confess.”
"Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes it's laws" — Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothschild


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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 12:34 pm 
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dolanbaker wrote:
ps200306 wrote:

It appears that DMW can see that we're returning to a way of life that existed before the industrial revolution, one where a small number of people owned everything and the vast majority owned nothing! Static wages, cheap mass produced goods (mostly by automated systems using only a few workers), asset inflation etc. All these are rapidly pulling the assets of value out of reach of the majority of people

If it wasn't for the diversions that modern technology provide in the form of cheap & instant entertainment, there could have already been an uprising!

Maybe it's time to revisit the idea of a universal income.

Is the problem with such a universal income, following DMcW's point, that it would have to be truly universal -- payable in Galway, Gujarat and Guangdong? Otherwise how do you increase costs without driving production elsewhere? I also wonder if there is scope for improving basic fairness before we resort to a universal income. Get rid of zero hours contracts and various other schemes that favour employers at the expense of employees. The industrial revolution eventually lifted living conditions because the working class eventually become a vast new market for the fruits of their own increased productivity. But only after exploitative conditions were eradicated through labour movements and activism. I could never be accused of being a left winger, but perhaps the needle has swung too far in the interests of free markets.

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Dec 21, 2017 1:25 pm 
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ps200306 wrote:
Is the problem with such a universal income, following DMcW's point, that it would have to be truly universal -- payable in Galway, Gujarat and Guangdong? Otherwise how do you increase costs without driving production elsewhere? I also wonder if there is scope for improving basic fairness before we resort to a universal income. Get rid of zero hours contracts and various other schemes that favour employers at the expense of employees. The industrial revolution eventually lifted living conditions because the working class eventually become a vast new market for the fruits of their own increased productivity. But only after exploitative conditions were eradicated through labour movements and activism. I could never be accused of being a left winger, but perhaps the needle has swung too far in the interests of free markets.

I agree with you in many places the needle is too far over - the US, where the fruits go to the already rich, the UK which has embraced the gig economy well beyond casual work. It seems the uber-capitalists of Ireland agree too, as they've been effectively banned - https://www.rte.ie/news/2017/0921/90662 ... contracts/ though there is a game of whack-a-mole and more to do.

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Quote:
The conventional full-time job is disappearing.

Survey research conducted by economists Lawrence Katz of Harvard University and Alan Krueger at Princeton University shows that from 2005 to 2015, the proportion of Americans workers engaged in what they refer to as “alternative work” jumped from 10.7% to 15.8%. Alternative work is characterized by being temporary or unsteady—such as work as an independent contractor or through a temporary help agency.

“We find that 94% of net job growth in the past decade was in the alternative work category,” said Krueger. “And over 60% was due to the [the rise] of independent contractors, freelancers and contract company workers.” In other words, nearly all of the 10 million jobs created between 2005 and 2015 were not traditional nine-to-five employment.

Krueger, a former chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, was surprised by the finding. The survey’s original goal was to quantify the size of the gig economy (0.5% and growing). The researchers were caught off guard by the tremendous growth of alternative work. There had been almost no change from 1995 to 2005.

Katz and Krueger found that each of the common types of alternative work increased from 2005 to 2015—with the largest changes in the number of independent contractors and workers provided by contract firms, such as janitors that work full-time at a particular office, but are paid by a janitorial services firm.

The decline of conventional full-time work has impacted every demographic. Whether this change is good or bad depends on what kinds of jobs people want. “Workers seeking full-time, steady work have lost,” said Krueger. “While many of those who value flexibility and have a spouse with a steady job have probably gained.”

For graphic designers and lawyers who hate going to an office, new technology and Obamacare has made it more appealing to become an independent contractor. But for those seeking a steady administrative assistant office job, the market is grim.

Women experienced an unusually large increase in the share of alternative work. They were three percentage points less likely than men to engage in alternative work in 2005, but two percentage points more likely in 2015. This is in large part because the sectors that saw the largest move towards alternative work arrangements—like education and medicine—have a high proportion of women.

More...

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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 12:11 pm 
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Wow crazy statistics, it's a society changing thing too


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 Post subject: Re: The low inflation mystery
PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:31 pm 
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Consumer Price Index, December 2017

http://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublica ... ember2017/

% monthly change -0.1%
% annual change +0.4%

Quote:
The most notable changes in the year were increases in Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas & Other Fuels (+3.6%), Restaurants & Hotels (+2.5%), Education (+1.6%) and Transport (+1.3%). There were decreases in Clothing & Footwear (-3.9%), Furnishings, Household Equipment & Routine Household Maintenance (-3.7%), Recreation & Culture (-1.9%) and Food & Non-Alcoholic Beverages(-1.5%).

Consumer Prices in December, as measured by the CPI, decreased by 0.1% in the month. During December of last year, prices remained unchanged in the month. The most significant monthly price changes were decreases in Clothing & Footwear (-1.8%), Food & Non-Alcoholic Beverages(-0.7%) and Alcoholic Beverages & Tobacco (-0.7%). There were increases in Transport (+0.8%) and Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas & Other Fuels (+0.4%).


Private Rents (table 7)
% monthly change +0.8%
% annual change +6.1%

Local Authority Rents (table 7)
% monthly change -0.4%
% annual change +5.5%


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